Build an Awesome Custom PC on Any Budget

Arctic

I’ve been building custom PCs for nearly 10 years now, and I greatly enjoy helping others build their own computers. Friends, acquaintances, and strangers often approach me, asking for advice on their next custom PC build. Every time I part out a new custom PC for someone, something I have done hundreds of times in the past, I will update this post. I hope it comes in handy when you’re building a PC of your own!

Please feel free to contact me if you’d like me to design a custom PC for you!

Note that all prices below will be the most accurate at the date noted above each build. Also, I would hugely appreciate it if you bought your PC parts from the Amazon links on this page, such that I may earn commission via Amazon Associates.

December 3, 2013

$1250 Custom PC for Jon

Part Type Part Name Link Price
Case Cooler Master Storm Scout 2 Advanced Amazon $94.99
CPU Intel Core i5-4670K Amazon $224.99
Motherboard MSI Z87-G45 GAMING Amazon $144.99 & $10 MIR
Memory 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600 MHz Amazon $149.99
GPU EVGA GTX 770 2GB w/ ACX Cooler Amazon $334.99 & $10 MIR
SSD Samsung 840 EVO 120GB Amazon $99.99
HDD Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB Amazon $86.95
PSU Corsair HX750 Modular 80+ Gold PSU Amazon $137.70
Total $1256.17

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2 comments on “Build an Awesome Custom PC on Any Budget
  1. alecd says:

    logicalincrements.com
    Why don’t people just use that site for builds…?

    • Zach says:

      People are free to do whatever they want! Both sites are great starting points, but I have a few problems with Logical Increments and PC Part Picker beyond the standard “always do your own research when building a PC:”

      1. Sites like the above disregard personal experience and preference.
      2. I’ve found that, most of the time, pricing data is inaccurate on those sites.
      3. These sites, especially PCP, tend to make people look at numbers (prices) instead of performance data.
      4. Blindly following a guide inherently eliminates the possibility of a parts list specifically tailored for an individual’s needs.

      For both PC building beginners and experts, I would strongly advise checking a parts list with people who have experience building PCs, like me, instead of blindly following a guide or the logical increments parts list.

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